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Research Article
Checklist of recent brachiopod species collected during the Terrasses and Exbodi cruises in the New Caledonian region, SW Pacific
expand article infoAleksandra Bitner
‡ Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Open Access

Abstract

Twenty species belonging to 16 genera, i.e. Neoancistrocrania, Novocrania, Basiliola, Basiliolella, Ebiscothyris, Stenosarina, Kanakythyris, Xenobrochus, Terebratulina, Eucalathis, Fallax, Frenulina, Septicollarina, Campages, Annuloplatidia, and Thecidellina have been identified in the material collected during the Terrasses and Exbodi cruises in the New Caledonian region, SW Pacific. The species Basiliolella grayi (Woodward, 1855) and Fallax neocaledonensis Laurin, 1997 are the most common in the studied collection, while Eucalathis murrayi (Davidson, 1878) is reported for the first time from the New Caledonian region.

Keywords

Brachiopoda, biodiversity, New Caledonia, South-West Pacific

Introduction

The New Caledonia Exclusive Economic Zone, comprising the area from Vanuatu to Chesterfield Islands, is one of the most intensively investigated regions in the Indo-West Pacific Province; more than 40 oceanographic expeditions have been organized by French institutions within the programme Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos (formerly Musorstom; see also Bouchet et al. 2008). Brachiopods collected in this region have been described in many publications (e.g. d’Hondt 1987; Laurin 1992, 1997; Bitner 2007a, 2009, 2010, 2011; Bitner et al. 2008; Bitner and Cohen 2015).

This paper deals with brachiopods collected during two cruises, Terrasses and Exbodi, organized by the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris and by the Institut de la Recherche pour le Développement, Nouméa, New Caledonia on R.V. “Alis” (Fig. 1). The cruise Terrasses (http://expeditions.mnhn.fr/campaign/terrasses) was carried out from 15 to 31 October 2008, south of New Caledonia, whereas the cruise Exbodi (http://expeditions.mnhn.fr/campaign/exbodi) to the Loyalty Ridge, east of New Caledonia was carried out from 2 to 28 September 2011. Samples were collected using a Warén dredge (DW) or a trawl (CP, CC). The brachiopods were found in 46 of 99 Terrasses stations, and in 56 of 161 Exbodi stations. See the Appendix for details of the stations and species distributions. The collections are stored in the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris under catalogue numbers IB-2013-171 to IB-2013-271, IB-2013-516 to IB-2013-552, and IB-2013-585 to IB-2013-616.

Figure 1.

Location map of the brachiopod-bearing stations of the Terrasses and Exbodi expeditions. 1 DW 3032 2 DW 3039–3042; 3 CP 3047 4 CP 3051 5 DW 3056 6 DW 3059–3060 7 DW 3062–3063, CP 3065–3068, DW 3069, CP 3070 8 DW 3072, DW 3075–3077 9 DW 3078–3079, DW 3082–3083 10 DW 3086, DW 3089–3090, CP 3091 11 DW 3093–3094, CP 3834 12 DW 3100, DW 3102, CP 3104, DW 3106–3110 13 DW 3120–3124, DW 3129 14 DW 3784–3785, CP 3786, DW 3787, CP 3788–3789, CP 3791–3793 15 DW 3798 16 CP 3842–3844, DW 3845 17 DW 3846, CP 3848–3849 18 CP 3851–3852, DW 3896, CP 3898, DW 3900 19 DW 3862–3863 20 CP 3871, DW 3872 21 DW 3880, CP 38882–3885, DW 3887, DW 3889, DW 3895 22 DW 3902–3903, DW 3913, DW 3916–3918 23 DW 3905–3907, CP 3911 24 DW 3922–3925, CP 3927, DW 3928, DW 3930, DW 3932–3933, DW 3949–3940.

Results

The brachiopod fauna recognized in the Terrasses and Exbodi cruises consists of 20 species belonging to 16 genera in 11 families (Craniidae, Basiliolidae, Terebratulidae, Dyscoliidae, Cancellothyrididae, Chlidonophoridae, Aulacothyropsidae, Frenulinidae, Dallinidae, Platidiidae, Thecidellinidae), four orders (Craniida, Rhynchonellida, Terebratulida, Thecideida), and two subphyla (Craniiformea, Rhynchonelliformea).

Family Craniidae Menke, 1828

Neoancistrocrania norfolki Laurin, 1992

Fig. 2A–B

This species, represented only by young individuals, was found only in two Exbodi stations at depths of 388–520 m. N. norfolki differs from other craniids by its massive ventral valve and internally by two erect divergent processes on the dorsal valve (Laurin 1997; Bitner 2009). Originally described from the Norfolk Ridge (Laurin 1992), it seems to be restricted to the Western Pacific (Cohen et al. 2014).

Figure 2.

A–B Neoancistrocrania norfolki Laurin, 1992, dorsal and lateral views of complete specimen (IB-2013–600), SEM, cruise Exbodi, stn DW 3925, 388 m C–D Basiliola lucida (Gould, 1862), dorsal and anterior views of complete specimen (IB-2013–542), cruise Exbodi, stn DW 3900, 366–357 m E–F Basiliolella grayi (Woodward, 1855), dorsal and anterior views of complete specimen (IB-2013–188), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3062, 300–320 m G–H Basiliola beecheri (Dall, 1895), dorsal and anterior views of complete specimen (IB-2013–215), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3083, 470–570 m.

Novocrania sp.

The second craniid brachiopod is very rare and too poorly preserved to permit identification to species level. It was found in two stations (600–802 m). Morpho-species identification of Novocrania is uncertain and previous specimens from the region of New Caledonia have been described as N. reevei Lee & Brunton, 1986 (see Bitner 2010). In the opinion of Robinson and Lee (2011) this is a synonym of N. japonica (Adams, 1863).

Family Basiliolidae Cooper, 1959

Basiliola beecheri (Dall, 1895)

Fig. 2G–H

This is one of three rhynchonellide species recognized in the studied material. B. beecheri is relatively common, found in 10 samples, with a depth range of 400–990 m and was already reported from the New Caledonian region (Laurin 1997; Zezina 2005; Bitner 2009). It also occurs in the Hawaii and Fiji regions (Dall 1895; Bitner 2006b, 2008).

Basiliola lucida (Gould, 1862)

Fig. 2C–D

This species, already noted from New Caledonia (Laurin 1997; Bitner 2009), is rare, being found in 5 stations. Its depth range in the studied area is 300–510 m. Originally described from off Japan (Hatai 1940), B. lucida also occurs in the Fiji region (Bitner 2008).

Basiliolella grayi (Woodward, 1855)

Fig. 2E–F

This is one of the most common species (nearly 500 specimens). It was found in 13 Terrasses stations and 12 Exbodi stations (see Appendix), with a depth range of 150–584 m. Basiliolella grayi is restricted to the SW Pacific (Laurin 1997; Logan 2007; Bitner 2009).

Family Terebratulidae Gray, 1840

Ebiscothyris bellonensis Bitner & Cohen, 2015

Fig. 3E–J

This species, recently described from the Coral Sea by Bitner and Cohen (2015), is common only in the material collected during the Exbodi cruise. Its depth range is very great, from 70 to 1180 m. Externally, E. bellonensis is very similar to Abyssothyris wyvillei (Davidson, 1878), but it differs internally in the character of the loop; in A. wyvillei the loop has a narrow, anteriorly convex transverse band (see Cooper 1983; Bitner 2006b, 2008), while in E. bellonensis the transverse band is broad and medially folded. Molecular analysis confirms this separation (Bitner and Cohen 2015).

Figure 3.

A–B Xenobrochus africanus (Cooper, 1973), dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–236), and enlargement of the posterior part to show details of the beak, SEM, cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3109, 150–180 m C–D Xenobrochus indianensis (Cooper, 1973), dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–602), and enlargement of the umbonal part to show details of the beak, SEM, cruise Exbodi, stn DW 3925, 388 m E–J Ebiscothyris bellonensis Bitner & Cohen, 2015, cruise Exbodi, E–G dorsal and anterior views of complete specimens (IB-2013–262), stn CP 3844, 815–970 m H–I interior and tilted (I) views of dorsal valve (IB-2013–262), SEM, stn CP 3844 J interior of dorsal valve (IB-2013–254), SEM, stn CP 3791, 750–863 m K–L Stenosarina globosa Laurin, 1997, dorsal and lateral views of complete specimen (IB-2013–227), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3102, 410–430 m M–N Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos Laurin, 1997, dorsal and lateral views of complete specimen (IB-2013–231), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3107, 380–440 m O–P Stenosarina crosnieri (Cooper, 1983), dorsal and lateral views of complete specimen (IB-2013–175), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3041, 800–840 m.

Stenosarina crosnieri (Cooper, 1983)

Fig. 3O–P

This short-looped terebratulide is a relatively common species in the investigated material, being already recorded from New Caledonia (Laurin 1997; Bitner 2009). About 50 specimens were found in 17 stations, with a depth range of 340–951 m. S. crosnieri was originally described from the south-western Indian Ocean (Cooper 1983).

Stenosarina globosa Laurin, 1997

Fig. 3K–L

The second Stenosarina species in the studied material is much rarer, being found in only five samples (386–570 m). Stenosarina globosa is smaller than S. crosnieri and characterized by a strongly convex shell. So far known only from the New Caledonia area (Laurin 1997), this species can be considered as endemic to this region.

Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos Laurin, 1997

Fig. 3M–N

This species is very characteristic with its thick shell, strongly incurved beak and very small foramen. It is relatively rare, being found in six samples (150–510 m). It is known only from the New Caledonian region (Laurin 1997; Bitner 2009) and can be regarded as endemic to this area.

Family Dyscoliidae Fischer & Oehlert, 1890

Xenobrochus africanus (Cooper, 1973)

Fig. 3A–B

A single specimen of this species was found in one Terrasses station at 150–180 m but it was earlier recorded from New Caledonia (Laurin 1997; Bitner 2010). X. africanus was originally described from South Africa (Cooper 1973).

Xenobrochus indianensis (Cooper, 1973)

Fig. 3C–D

This second species of Xenobrochus is also very rare, found in one Exbodi station at a depth of 388 m. Laurin (1997) already noted this species from New Caledonia. It was originally described from South Africa (Cooper 1973). Xenobrochus indianensis can be distinguished from X. africanus by a more convex shell, incurved beak with a partly concealed symphytium, and internally by the presence of a distinct cardinal process (Cooper 1973, 1983; Laurin 1997).

Family Cancellothyrididae Thomson, 1926

Terebratulina pacifica Yabe & Hatai, 1934

Fig. 4D

This is a relatively common species, found in 12 stations (180–790 m). Its presence in the studied area was already noted (Laurin 1997; Bitner 2009), and it is common off Japan (Hatai 1940). This wide distribution suggests that a careful molecular analysis of a wide range of Pacific Ocean samples might lead to the recognition of multiple forms that have not been distinguished morphologically (e.g. Lüter and Cohen 2002).

Figure 4.

A–C Eucalathis murrayi (Davidson, 1878), cruise Exbodi, SEM A–B dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–601), and enlargement (B) of posterior part to show details of the beak, stn DW 3925, 388m C dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–588), stn CP 3911, 680–802 m D Terebratulina pacifica Yabe & Hatai, 1934, dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–214), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3082, 290 m E Campages mariae (Adams, 1860), dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–259), cruise Exbodi, stn CP 3834, 27–258 m F–G Frenulina sanguinolenta (Gmelin, 1791) F interior of dorsal valve (IB-2013–525), SEM, cruise Exbodi, stn 3872, 159–756 m G dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–192), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3063, 430–480 m H–I Septicollarina zezinae Bitner, 2009, cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3040, 750–780 m (IB-2013–173) H dorsal view of complete specimen I exterior of ventral valve, visible randomly distributed, small pustules J–K Fallax neocaledonensis Laurin, 1997, dorsal and anterior views of complete specimen (IB-2013–210), cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3077, 420–540 m.

Family Chlidonophoridae Muir-Wood, 1959

Eucalathis murrayi (Davidson, 1878)

Fig. 4A–C

This species is very rare and was found in only two Exbodi stations (388–802 m). Although known from the nearby New Zealand region (MacFarlan et al. 2009), this is the first report of E. murrayi from the vicinity of New Caledonia. Originally described from off the Kermadec Islands (Davidson 1880) it has a wide distribution in the south-western Pacific (Bitner 2006a) and is known from the western Indian Ocean (Zezina 1987).

So far the only representative of the family Chlidonophoridae reported from New Caledonia has been Eucalathis rugosa Cooper, 1973 (see Laurin 1997; Bitner 2009, 2010), which is characterized by strong ornamentation of single, coarse ribs, while in E. murrayi ribs are numerous, finer, and bifurcating. DNA sequences of these species have not yet been compared (B.L. Cohen, pers. communication).

Family Aulacothyropsidae Dagys, 1972

Fallax neocaledonensis Laurin, 1997

Fig. 4J–K

This long-looped brachiopod is one of the most common (more than 250 specimens) and was identified in 20 stations (260–840 m). F. neocaledonensis was originally described from New Caledonia by Laurin (1997; see also Bitner 2009) and was also recognized in material from Fiji (Bitner 2006b, 2008).

Septicollarina zezinae Bitner, 2009

Fig. 4H–I

This rare species was found in one station of each cruise (680–802 m). Originally described from the Norfolk Ridge (Bitner 2009) it was also identified around Fiji and French Polynesia (Bitner 2008, 2014).

Family Frenulinidae Hatai, 1938

Frenulina sanguinolenta (Gmelin, 1791)

Fig. 4F–G

This easily recognizable species was found in 20 stations but was abundant only in the Exbodi material where it appears to have a very wide bathymetric range (110 to 1100 m). However this range probably is the result of the wide depth-range of the DW3932 dredge haul (500 to 1100 m), the specimens of this generally shallow-water form probably having been collected only in the shallower water.

Frenulina sanguinolenta is one of the most widely distributed species of living brachiopods, known from Japan, Australia, New Caledonia, Fiji, French Polynesia and Hawaii (Hatai 1940; Emig 1987; Saito 1996; Laurin 1997; Bitner 2006a, 2006b, 2007a, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014). Recently this species has also been identified in the western Indian Ocean (Bitner and Logan in press).

Family Dallinidae Beecher, 1893

Campages mariae (Adams, 1860)

Fig. 4E

In the studied material this species was found in 16 stations in the material of both cruises at depths of 180–790 m. Originally described from off Japan (Hatai 1940), C. mariae occurs in the Western Pacific (Logan 2007; Bitner 2009, 2010).

Family Platidiidae Thomson, 1927

Annuloplatidia richeri Bitner, 2009

Fig. 5F–J

This species was originally described from the Norfolk Ridge where it was very common (see Bitner 2009). Here, A. richeri is rare, found in one Terrasses station and two Exbodi stations (622–802 m). It is characterized by numerous, transversely elongate pustules that cover the ventral valve (Fig. 5H–J). A. richeri can be treated as endemic to the New Caledonian region as it has not yet been recognized in other areas.

Figure 5.

A–E Thecidellina maxilla (Hedley, 1899), cruise Exbodi, stn DW 3905, 300 m, (IB-2013–549) A–B dorsal view of complete specimen and enlargement of the posterior part to show flat pseudodeltidium (planodeltidium) C–E inner, posterior (D) and oblique (E) views of dorsal valve to show bridge, median lobe of cardinal process and median septum F–J Annuloplatidia richeri Bitner, 2009 F–G dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–616), and enlargement of the umbonal part, cruise Terrasses, stn DW 3040, 750–780 m H–I ventral view of complete specimen (IB-2013–592), and enlargement of shell surface to show nodes, cruise Exbodi, stn DW 3913, 622 m J dorsal view of complete specimen (IB-2013–590), cruise Exbodi, stn DW 3911, 680–802 m K–L Annuloplatidia curiosa Bitner, 2014, ventral and dorsal views of complete specimen (IB-2013–522), cruise Exbodi, stn DW 3862, 400–520 m. All SEM.

Annuloplatidia curiosa Bitner, 2014

Fig. 5K–L

This species is very rare, found in only one Exbodi station at depths of 400–520 m. It was already reported from New Caledonia by Laurin (1997), but was wrongly assigned by him to Megerlia echinata (Fischer & Œhlert, 1890) (see discussion in Bitner 2014: 256). It has a very wide distribution, being known from New Zealand, Wallis and Futuna Islands, and French Polynesia (Bitner 2007b, 2008, 2014).

Family Thecidellinidae Elliott, 1953

Thecidellina maxilla (Hedley, 1899)

Fig. 5A–E

This is the only thecideide brachiopod in the investigated material. This species was found in 10 Exbodi stations with a very wide depth range (159 to 1100 m) but as noted before (see Frenulina sanguinolenta above) this may be an artefact. Already noted from New Caledonian waters (Laurin 1997; Bitner 2007a, 2009, 2010), Thecidellina maxilla is widely distributed in the SW Pacifc, from New Zealand to French Polynesia (Lee and Robinson 2003; Bitner 2007b, 2008, 2014; Logan 2007; MacFarlan et al. 2009).

Summary

The brachiopods collected south of New Caledonia during the Terrasses cruise are represented by 15 species belonging to 13 genera. In the material from the Loyalty Ridge collected during the Exbodi cruise 19 species belonging to 16 genera have been identified. Fourteen species, i.e. Novocrania sp., Basiliola beecheri, B. lucida, Basiliolella grayi, Ebiscothyris bellonensis, Stenosarina crosnieri, S. globosa, Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos, Terebratulina pacifica, Fallax neocaledonensis, Septicollarina zezinae, Frenulina sanguinolenta, Annuloplatidia richeri and Campages mariae are common to both collections. One species, Xenobrochus africanus, found in the Terrasses collection was not recognized in the Exbodi material, whereas Neoancistrocrania norfolki, Xenobrochus indianensis, Eucalathis murrayi, Annuloplatidia curiosa, and Thecidellina maxilla were found in the Exbodi cruise but not in the Terrasses cruise. Eucalathis murrayi was reported for the first time from the New Caledonian region.

Most species recognized here have a wide geographical distribution, being known either in the Western Pacific or in the Indo-West Pacific Province. Only four species, E. bellonensis, S. globosa, K. pachyrhynchos, and A. richeri can be treated as endemic to the New Caledonian region.

With the new record of E. murrayi from New Caledonia, the total number of species recognized in this region is now 45 (d’Hondt 1987; Laurin 1997; Bitner 2007a, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014; Bitner et al. 2008; Bitner and Cohen 2015), of which 8 are in common with New Zealand (compare Bitner 2010, 2014, and this study). The New Caledonian brachiopod fauna shows the greatest affinity with that from Fiji, sharing 11 of 22 species (Bitner 2006b, 2008).

Acknowledgments

Warm thanks are expressed to P. Bouchet (MNHN, Paris) for the opportunity to study the material. I am very grateful to P. Maestrati for sorting the material and to P. Lozouet (both MNHN, Paris) for the facilities during my visit at the Muséum. C.C. Emig (BrachNet, Marseille) is acknowledged for his suggestions. B.L. Cohen (University of Glasgow, Glasgow) is thanked for valuable comments on an earlier draft of the manuscript. I also wish to thank D.E. Lee (University of Otago, Dunedin) and A. Logan (University of New Brunswick, Saint John) for their helpful reviews. This research has been supported by a grant No. 2012/05/B/NZ8/01023 of the National Science Centre of Poland. I thank A. Hołda-Michalska (Institute of Paleobiology, Warszawa) for help in the preparation of Fig. 1. The SEM micrographs were taken in the SEM laboratory of the Institute of Paleobiology (Warszawa) using a Philips XL-20 scanning microscope. The macrophotos were taken by G. Dziewińska (Institute of Paleobiology, Warszawa) to whom I am very grateful.

References

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Appendix

List of brachiopod-bearing stations and species per station.

Station Location Depth Species
Terrasses
Loyalty Ridge
DW 3032 22°41’S, 168°58’E 760–820 m Basiliola beecheri
DW 3039 23°57’S, 169°44’E 600–680 m Novocrania sp.
DW 3040 23°58’S, 169°43’E 750–780 m Septicollarina zezinae
Annuloplatidia richeri
DW 3041 23°59’S, 169°44’E 800–840 m Basiliola beecheri
Stenosarina crosnieri
Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3042 23°56’S, 169°43’E 920–990 m Basiliola beecheri
CP 3047 23°35’S, 169°37'E 266–267 m Basiliolella grayi
Stenosarina crosnieri
Fallax neocaledonensis
Norfolk Ridge
CP 3051 23°48'S, 168°17'E 410–530 m Stenosarina crosnieri
Fallax neocaledonensis
Campages mariae
DW 3056 23°42'S, 168°01'E 250–330 m Basiliolella grayi
DW 3059 23°40'S, 167°44'E 440–450 m Campages mariae
DW 3060 23°39'S, 167°44'E 440–450 m Campages mariae
DW 3062 23°22'S, 168°02'E 300–320 m Basiliolella grayi
Frenulina sanguinolenta
DW 3063 23°23'S, 168°00.4'E 430–480 m Terebratulina pacifica
Fallax neocaledonensis
Frenulina sanguinolenta
CP 3065 23°21'S, 168°00'E 480–550 m Fallax neocaledonensis
CP 3066 23°18'S, 167°59'E 650–790 m Stenosarina crosnieri
Fallax neocaledonensis
CP 3067 23°17'S, 167°58'E 800 m Stenosarina crosnieri
CP 3068 23°16'S, 167°57'E 790 m Basiliola beecheri
Stenosarina crosnieri
Terebratulina pacifica
Fallax neocaledonensis
Campages mariae
DW 3069 23°18'S, 168°05'E 300–320 m Basiliola lucida
Stenosarina crosnieri
Campages mariae
CP 3070 23°18'S, 168°05'E 300–320 m Stenosarina crosnieri
DW 3072 23°19'S, 168°16'E 180–220 m Terebratulina pacifica
DW 3075 23°17'S, 168°14'E 270 m Basiliolella grayi
DW 3076 23°14'S, 168°13'E 390–570 m Stenosarina globosa
DW 3077 23°15'S, 168°14'E 420–540 m Stenosarina crosnieri
Fallax neocaledonensis
SW Terrasses
DW 3078 22°29'S, 167°30'E 180–210 m Basiliolella grayi
Campages mariae
DW 3079 22°28'S, 167°29'E 300–420 m Basiliolella grayi
DW 3082 22°29'S, 167°23'E 290 m Terebratulina pacifica
DW 3083 22°27'S, 167°25'E 470–570 m Basiliola beecheri
Terebratulina pacifica
Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3086 22°15'S, 167°13'E 400 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
DW 3089 22°17'S, 167°12'E 390–410 m Stenosarina globosa
DW 3090 22°16'S, 167°08'E 260 m Basiliolella grayi
Campages mariae
CP 3091 22°17'S, 167°09'E 260–270 m Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3093 22°06'S, 167°03'E 190–200 m Basiliolella grayi
DW 3094 22°04'S, 167°03'E 250–300 m Basiliolella grayi
Norfolk Ridge
DW 3100 22°59'S, 168°23'E 260–320 m Basiliolella grayi
Terebratulina pacifica
DW 3102 22°59'S, 168°23'E 410–430 m Stenosarina globosa
CP 3104 22°58'S, 168°21'E 410–470 m Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos
DW 3106 23°02'S, 168°21'E 180–220 m Basiliolella grayi
Campages mariae
DW 3107 23°01'S, 168°23'E 380–440 m Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos
Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3108 23°01'S, 168°239'E 370–440 m Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos
DW 3109 23°01'S, 168°18'E 150–180 m Basiliolella grayi
Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos
Xenobrochus africanus
DW 3110 23°02'S, 168°16'E 270–310 m Basiliolella grayi
Pine Island
DW 3120 22°44'S, 167°15'E 320–360 m Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3121 22°45'S, 167°13'E 380–400 m Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3122 22°47'S, 167°12'E 390–410 m Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3123 22°53'S, 167°13'E 420–450 m Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3124 22°54'S, 167°15'E 460 m Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3129 22°42'S, 167°15'E 110–130 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Exbodi
New Caledonia
DW 3784 22°13'S, 22°13'S 353–365 m Stenosarina crosnieri
Fallax neocaledonensis
DW 3785 22°15'S, 167°10'E 386–387 m Stenosarina globosa
CP 3786 22°15'S, 167°13'E 406–442 m Stenosarina globosa
DW 3787 22°13'S, 167°06'E 223–249 m Basiliolella grayi
Campages mariae
CP 3788 22°13'S, 167°07'E 264–273 m Basiliolella grayi
Campages mariae
CP 3789 22°11'S, 167°07'E 335–350 m Basiliolella grayi
Campages mariae
CP 3791 22°15'S, 167°19'E 750–863 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
CP 3792 22°18'S, 167°22'E 850–876 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
CP 3793 22°16'S, 167°23'E 951–1180 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
DW 3798 21°32'S, 166°21'E 478–480 m Basiliola beecheri
CP 3834 22°06'S, 167°04'E 257–258 m Basiliolella grayi
Campages mariae
CP 3842 22°23'S, 167°22'E 756–769 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
CP 3843 22°22'S, 22°22'S 776–800 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
CP 3844 22°20'S, 167°22'E 815–970 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
DW 3845 22°30'S, 167°09'E 70–72 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
DW 3846 22°04'S, 168°38'E 396 m Basiliolella grayi
CP 3848 22°03'S, 168°42'E 430–440 m Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos
CP 3849 22°03'S, 168°41'E 360–560 m Fallax neocaledonensis
CP 3851 22°19'S, 168°45'E 471–510 m Basiliola lucida
Stenosarina crosnieri
Kanakythyris pachyrhynchos
Terebratulina pacifica
Fallax neocaledonensis
Campages mariae
CP 3852 22°17'S, 168°43'E 582 m Stenosarina crosnieri
Fallax neocaledonensis
Campages mariae
DW 3862 22°20'S, 169°01'E 400–520 m Neoancistrocrania norfolki
Basiliola beecheri
Annuloplatidia curiosa
DW 3863 22°21'S, 168°59'E 540–660 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
CP 3871 22°53'S, 169°25'E 580–780 m Basiliola beecheri
DW 3872 22°54'S, 169°27'E 159–756 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3880 22°22'S, 171°39'E 350 m Basiliolella grayi
Terebratulina pacifica
CP 3882 22°21'S, 171°40'E 288 - 361 m Basiliolella grayi
CP 3883 22°21'S, 171°39'E 433–516 m Basiliolella grayi
CP 3884 22°22'S, 171°38'E 521–567 m Basiliolella grayi
Terebratulina pacifica
CP 3885 22°23'S, 171°39'E 558–584 m Basiliolella grayi
Terebratulina pacifica
DW 3887 22°22'S, 171°42'E 257–298 m Basiliolella grayi
DW 3889 22°25'S, 171°41'E 354 m Basiliolella grayi
DW 3895 22°25'S, 171°40'E 380 m Stenosarina crosnieri
DW 3896 22°19'S, 168°41'E 340–343 m Basiliola lucida
Terebratulina pacifica
CP 3898 22°18'S, 168°42'E
340–346 m Basiliola lucida
Stenosarina crosnieri
DW 3900 22°17'S, 168°41'E 355–357 m Basiliola lucida
Stenosarina crosnieri
Campages mariae
DW 3902 19°53'S, 165°49'E 410 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
DW 3903 19°52'S, 165°50'E 580 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3905 19°50'S, 165°34'E 300 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3906 19°50'S, 165°33'E 490–580 m Terebratulina pacifica
Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3907 19°50'S, 165°33'E 608–671 m Thecidellina maxilla
CP 3911 19°50'S, 165°33'E 680–802 m Novocrania sp.
Basiliola beecheri
Eucalathis murrayi
Septicollarina zezinae
Annuloplatidia richeri
DW 3913 19°45'S, 165°45'E 622 m Basiliola beecheri
Annuloplatidia richeri
DW 3916 19°52'S, 165°55'E 749–922 m Ebiscothyris bellonensis
DW 3917 19°52'S, 165°55'E 753–951 m Stenosarina crosnieri
DW 3918 19°52'S, 165°55'E 748–922 m Stenosarina crosnieri
DW 3922 18°33'S, 164°21'E 525–560 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
DW 3923 18°33'S, 164°20'E 580–703 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3924 18°35'S, 164°23'E 730 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
DW 3925 18°35'S, 164°19'E 388 m Neoancistrocrania norfolki
Eucalathis murrayi
Xenobrochus indianensis
Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
CP 3927 18°36'S, 164°20'E 381 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Campages mariae
DW 3928 18°38'S, 164°20'E 362–402 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3930 18°37'S, 164°26'E 448–464 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
DW 3932 18°32'S, 164°21'E 500–1100 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3933 18°32'S, 164°22'E 474 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
Thecidellina maxilla
DW 3939 18°36'S, 164°24'E 489–860 m Frenulina sanguinolenta
DW 3940 18°36'S, 164°24'E 380–430 m Frenulina sanguinolenta